ANSYS TurboGrid Tutorials

1.Introduction to the ANSYS TurboGrid Tutorials
The ANSYS TurboGrid tutorials are designed to introduce general mesh-generation techniques used in
ANSYS TurboGrid.

2.Rotor 37
This tutorial includes:
2.1. Overview of the Mesh Creation Process
2.2. Before You Begin
2.3. Starting ANSYS TurboGrid
2.4. Defining the Geometry
2.5. Defining the Topology
2.6. Reviewing the Mesh Data Settings
2.7. Reviewing the Mesh Quality on the Hub and Shroud Tip Layers
2.8. Generating the Mesh
2.9. Looking at Mesh Data Values
2.10. Analyzing the Mesh Quality
2.11.Visualizing the Hub-to-Shroud Element Distribution
2.12. Observing the Shroud Tip Mesh
2.13. Examining the Mesh Qualitatively
2.14. Creating a Legend
2.15. Saving the Mesh
2.16. Saving the State (Optional)
This tutorial demonstrates the basic workflow for generating a CFD mesh using ANSYS TurboGrid. As
you work through this tutorial, you will create a mesh for a blade passage of an axial compressor blade
row. A typical blade passage is shown by the black outline in the figure below.

3.Steam Stator
This tutorial includes:
3.1. Before You Begin
3.2. Starting ANSYS TurboGrid
3.3. Defining the Geometry
3.4. Defining the Topology
3.5. Reviewing the Mesh Data Settings
3.6. Reviewing the Mesh Quality on the Hub and Shroud Layers
3.7. Generating the Mesh
3.8. Analyzing the Mesh
3.9. Saving the Mesh
3.10. Saving the State (Optional)
This tutorial teaches you how to:
• Import hub, shroud, and blade geometry from individual curve files.
• Change the method of constructing the hub and shroud curve types.
• Make colored surfaces to show variations in mesh measures (such as
Minimum Face Angle).
As you work through this tutorial, you will create a mesh for a blade passage of a steam stator. A typical
blade passage is shown by the black outline in the figure below.

4.Radial Compressor
This tutorial includes:
4.1. Before You Begin
4.2. Starting ANSYS TurboGrid
4.3. Defining the Geometry
4.4. Defining the Topology
4.5. Reviewing the Mesh Data Settings
4.6. Generating the Mesh
4.7. Analyzing the Mesh
4.8. Saving the Mesh
4.9. Saving the State (Optional)
This tutorial teaches you how to:
• Set machine data and load curve files independently.
• Specify a “cut-off or square” edge on a blade.
• Choose an appropriate topology family under
ATM Topology.
As you work through this tutorial, you will create a mesh for a blade passage of a radial compressor
blade row using the Automatic Topology and Meshing (ATM Optimized) feature. A typical blade passage
is shown by the black outline in the figure below.

5.Axial Fan Using ATM Optimized Topology
This tutorial includes:
5.1. Before You Begin
5.2. Starting ANSYS TurboGrid
5.3. Defining the Geometry
5.4. Defining the Topology
5.5. Increasing the Mesh Density
5.6. Generating the Mesh
5.7. Using the Locking Feature
5.8.The Y+ Functionality
5.9. Using Local Mesh Refinement
5.10. Analyzing the Mesh
5.11. Adding Inlet and Outlet Domains
5.12. Analyzing the New Mesh
5.13. Saving the Mesh
5.14. Saving the State (Optional)
This tutorial teaches you how to:
• Switch to a Meridional (A-R) projection in the viewer.
• Change the shape and position of the
Inlet and Outlet geometry objects which bound the blade
passage in the streamwise direction.
• Use the ATM Optimized feature to generate and customize a mesh as desired.
• Extend the mesh by adding inlet and outlet domains.
This tutorial is very similar to
Axial Fan Using Traditional Topology (p. 43). The notable difference is the
use of the ATM Optimized feature to generate and control the mesh. As you work through this tutorial,
you will create a mesh for a blade passage of a fan. A typical blade passage, inlet domain, and outlet
domain, are shown by the black outline in the figure below

6.Axial Fan Using Traditional Topology
This tutorial includes:
6.1. Before You Begin
6.2. Starting ANSYS TurboGrid
6.3. Defining the Geometry
6.4. Defining the Topology
6.5. Reviewing the Mesh Data Settings
6.6. Reviewing the Mesh Quality on the Hub and Shroud Tip Layers
6.7. Adding Intermediate Layers
6.8. Generating the Mesh
6.9. Analyzing the Mesh
6.10. Adding Inlet and Outlet Domains
6.11. Regenerating the Mesh
6.12. Analyzing the New Mesh
6.13. Saving the Mesh
6.14. Saving the State (Optional)
This tutorial teaches you how to:
• Switch to a Meridional (A-R) projection in the viewer.
• Change the shape and position of the
Inlet and Outlet geometry objects that bound the blade passage
in the streamwise direction.
• Specify the use of a General Grid Interface on the periodic surfaces of the blade passage.
• Extend the mesh by adding inlet and outlet domains.
As you work through this tutorial, you will create a mesh for a blade passage of a fan. A typical blade
passage, inlet domain, and outlet domain, are shown by the black outline in the figure below.

7.Splitter Blades
This tutorial includes:
7.1. Before You Begin
7.2. Starting ANSYS TurboGrid
7.3. Defining the Geometry
7.4. Defining the Topology
7.5. Reviewing the Topology Settings
7.6. Reviewing the Mesh Data Settings
7.7. Reviewing the Mesh Quality on the Hub and Shroud Layers
7.8. Generating the Mesh
7.9. Analyzing the Mesh
7.10. Saving the Mesh
7.11. Saving the State (Optional)
This tutorial teaches you how to:
• Review the topology type for each blade.
• Create a mesh involving splitter blades.
As you work through this tutorial, you will create a mesh for a blade set of a centrifugal compressor
that has splitter blades. A typical blade set is shown by the black outline in the figure below.

8.Tandem Vane
This tutorial includes:
8.1. Before You Begin
8.2. Starting ANSYS TurboGrid
8.3. Defining the Geometry
8.4. Defining the Topology
8.5. Reviewing the Topology Settings
8.6. Reviewing the Mesh Data Settings
8.7. Reviewing the Mesh Quality on the Hub and Shroud Layers
8.8. Increasing the Mesh Density
8.9. Further Modifying the Hub Layer
8.10. Generating the Mesh
8.11. Saving the Mesh
8.12. Saving the State (Optional)
This tutorial teaches you how to:
• Load geometry data from a CFG file.
• Copy control points and their custom positional offsets from one topology layer to another.
• Use “sticky” control points.
• Create a mesh involving tandem vanes.
As you work through this tutorial, you will create a mesh for a blade set of a radial machine component
that has tandem vanes. A typical blade set is shown by the black outline in the figure below.

9.Batch Mode Studies
Note
This tutorial requires using ANSYS TurboGrid in batch mode, which is not possible from ANSYS
Workbench.
This tutorial has two parts:
Part 1: Parametric Study (p. 71)
Part 2: Grid Refinement (p. 75)
Part 1 of this tutorial demonstrates one basic way of performing a parametric study using ANSYS TurboGrid in batch mode: using a script loop to repeatedly modify and run a session file with ANSYS TurboGrid. Each modified session file loads a baseline state file, reloads the blade geometry from a different
file, and generates and saves output (including a mesh).
Part 2 of this tutorial demonstrates a grid refinement study using a method similar to part 1. The main
difference in part 2 is the use of the “end ratio” option throughout the mesh data specification to allow
the grid refinement to occur evenly through the mesh.
Variations of the algorithm described in this tutorial are possible. For example:
• You could modify the state file instead of the session file.
• You could use a loop within a session file (written in Perl) to avoid loading and closing ANSYS TurboGrid
repeatedly, which should improve efficiency.
Such variations are beyond the scope of this tutorial. You are encouraged to try the algorithm used in
this tutorial and then explore other methods as required in order to meet your specific requirements.

10.Deformed Turbine
This tutorial includes:
10.1. Before You Begin
10.2. Starting ANSYS TurboGrid
10.3. Mesh for the Deformed Blade Group
10.4. Mesh for an Undeformed Blade
10.5. Summary
10.6. Further Exercise
This tutorial teaches you how to:
• Build a blade set by loading blades separately from files and rotating them into position.
• Save, load, and rotate periodic surfaces.
• Make separate and different meshes that are designed to fit together in a CFD simulation.
As you work through this tutorial, you will create meshes for modeling an axial turbine blade row that
has a deformed blade. The technique learned here can be extended to model a blade row with several
deformed blades. A blade can become deformed after being damaged, for example by the passage of
a foreign object.

Deformed Turbine
This tutorial includes:
10.1. Before You Begin
10.2. Starting ANSYS TurboGrid
10.3. Mesh for the Deformed Blade Group
10.4. Mesh for an Undeformed Blade
10.5. Summary
10.6. Further Exercise
This tutorial teaches you how to:
• Build a blade set by loading blades separately from files and rotating them into position.
• Save, load, and rotate periodic surfaces.
• Make separate and different meshes that are designed to fit together in a CFD simulation.
As you work through this tutorial, you will create meshes for modeling an axial turbine blade row that
has a deformed blade. The technique learned here can be extended to model a blade row with several
deformed blades. A blade can become deformed after being damaged, for example by the passage of
a foreign object.

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